News
Register

ERuDeF Live Search

News

27 September 2016

Water Management Committee Installed To Resolve Menji Water Crisis

Posted in News, Views 471

Water Management Committee Installed To Resolve Menji Water Crisis

A Water Management Committee has been put in place in Menji, Chief Town of the Lebialem Division to ensure the proper maintenance and management of water schemes in this area.

The Committee, which has as Chairman, Fogap Ivo was installed during an enlarged water management forum organized last August 29, 2016 at the Women Empowerment Center in Menji to seek lasting solutions to water crisis that has been plaguing the area for some time now.

The newly elected Water Management Committee was to work in collaboration with the Menji Council for the maintenance and management of the Azi-Menji-Ndasoa Water Scheme. Meanwhile, the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) was to oversee tree planting activities around water catchments and sensitise the population on sustainable practices around such catchments.

Speaking during the forum, the Lord Mayor of Menji Council, Chief Barrister Atabong, thanked all present. He remarked that the massive turnout was an indication of how much commitment they accorded to solving the crisis.

The Mayor pledged his Council’s total collaboration in the execution of its own quota of the scheme’s demand. He added that in the days ahead, a municipal decision empowering the Committee to officially commence work will be signed.

Meanwhile, the newly elected Chairman, Mr. Fogap Ivo, said the first plan of action for the Committee will be to carry out diagnosis of the whole water scheme, create a data base of all water users and open an office where water users can acquire information and pay their bills.

Over the years, access to portable water in this area has been very difficult. The inhabitants often trek several kilometres in search of clean water. The deplorable situation warranted prompt actions. Thus, the Menji Council, the Water Management Committee and ERuDeF are expected to collaborate amongst themselves such that the existing water sources are sustainably managed.

By Ngueping Samuel

26 September 2016

Enhancing Local Stakeholders’ Participation in the Implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade – Voluntary Partnership Agreement (FLEGT-VPA) in Western Cameroon

Posted in News, Views 483

 Enhancing Local Stakeholders’ Participation in the Implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade – Voluntary Partnership Agreement (FLEGT-VPA) in Western Cameroon

High demand for cheap timber and growing pressure on forests for conversion to agricultural use, amidst weak legislations, has led to illegal practices within the forest sector. Faced with these, the European Union (EU) embarked on the FLEGT process in 2007. In 2012, Cameroon government finalised negotiations for a VPA with the EU, demonstrating her willingness to trade in legal timber both at the domestic and international markets. The negotiations of the FLEGT/VPA process also took into account, community forests. Therefore, timber and other derived products coming from community forests must show proof of its legal origin. Hence local stakeholders need to collaborate and actively participate in the implementation process of the VPA, by ensuring compliance with policies and legal frameworks.

However, a number of constraints which are crucial to the smooth and effective implementation of the agreement are being faced by local communities. ERuDeF’s findings show that the challenges are more intense in the Western part of Cameroon. These challenges include, amongst others, the lack of required information about FLEGT-VPA process, lack of technical skills, knowledge and finance for the implementation of the process. Also, lack of appropriate grounds to discuss sustainable forest management issues, take concrete decisions and implement agreements still poses a problem in the successful implementation of the FLEGT-VPA process. Moreover, lack of qualitative communication strategies which can help local stakeholders with potentials to enhance the implementation process is a big challenge.

The global objectives of the project is therefore, to enhance local stakeholders’ participation in the implementation process through sensitization, establishment of successful dialogue platforms and strengthening of communication systems and modalities.

In order to achieve the overall objective, the project seeks to:

- organise 4 sensitisation and awareness workshops at the level of local communities on the implication and exigencies of FLEGT-VPA;

- establish and facilitate 4 dialogue platforms at local levels, each made up of 25 participants who shall be transparently selected, to foster information sharing and decision making;

- organise 4 capacity building workshops to train platform participants on key topics in order to facilitate their involvement;

- produce and distribute brochures, roll-ups, posters, calendars and T-shirts carrying key issues concerning FLEGT-VPA, policies and legal frameworks, aimed at strengthening communication;

- produce and implant 60 sign boards carrying key information about users’ rights and land tenure, at the level of local communities, so as to increase awareness;

- publish and distribute monthly community newsletters (4 pages each) targeting issues about FLEGT/VPA, sustainable forest management and illegalities, in order to increase transparency and accountability.

It is expected that with all these put in place, about 70 % of the local stakeholders are actively involved in the implementation process, level of transparency in the sector and accountability have increased to appreciable levels, illegal practices and conflicts are reduced to near zero, and there is good coordination in the sector.

The project shall cost the sum of US$110 000, broken down into the following main headings:

- Sensitization campaigns – 16 000 US$

- Establishment and facilitation of platforms - 38 000 US$

- Capacity building workshop for platform participants - 24 000 US$

- Production of brochures, roll ups, posters, calendars and T-shirts - 13 000 US$

- Production of monthly community newsletters - 10 000 US$

- Production and implantation of awareness boards - 9 000 US$

The project which shall last for a period of 15 months shall be executed by a team of experts within ERuDeF and co-partners. With ERuDeF’s long term commitment in the project area, it will continue to work with its partners to ensure sustainability of the project. ERuDeF is currently embarking on the DRYAD project with support from DFID UK, to provide training, technical and financial assistance to sustainable community forest enterprises in South West Cameroon. This proves the organisation’s commitment in community forestry in the area.

More information can be gotten on the ERuDeF’s website at www.erudef.org

26 September 2016

Securing the Survival of Critically Endangered Wildlife Species in the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary, South West Cameroon .

Posted in News, Views 447

 Securing the Survival of Critically Endangered Wildlife Species in the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary, South West Cameroon .

Cameroon is ranked 5th in terms of biodiversity in Africa and second only after the Democratic Republic of Congo in primates’ diversity (Mc Neely, 1988). In addition, several species of endangered primates are still relatively well represented in Cameroon’s forests; they include Drills, the Mandrills, Colobus and particularly the gorillas and the chimpanzees. Though well represented, these species have been declining significantly as a result of anthropogenic threats, since most of them are found outside of the protected areas.

In spite of significant conservation and protection measures taken, many species including the gorillas and the chimpanzees, remain strongly threatened by the combined effects of several factors such as; poaching, traffic in young animals, deforestation, logging, mining, fragmentation of habitats, bush fires, inadequate enforcement of the forestry law, poverty among others. This is further increased by the fact that these species remain outside of the protected areas where there’s no proper wildlife management. Knowledge about the present condition and status of these species remain inadequate. Biological and socio-economic surveys remain insufficient. Poverty also is in high rate due to the lack of alternative income generating activities; as such the local communities depend largely on natural resources for their survival.

In order to minimize the consequences of these factors and ensure a better protection of Great Apes, other primates and their natural habitats, the creation and proper management of protected areas is very much important. It is based on this that ERuDeF is seeking financial support for the creation and management of the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary.

The Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary in the Lebialem Highlands of SW Cameroon is one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in Cameroon. This area is home to critically endangered Cross River gorilla, Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, African forest elephants, Drill and other endangered avian, plants and amphibians species of global importance. Therefore the creation of this site as a protected area will ensure the long term survival of these species. This will enable proper protection and conservation of the area.

At the end of the implementation of the project, the proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary will finally have the status of a protected area, known as the Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. Hence, the endangered and critically endangered species will be protected, and thus securing their survival.

                    This project therefore seeks to;

· create and sustainably manage the Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary,

· developed the management and business plans for Make-Betchou,

· conduct biological and socio-economic surveys,

· support the development of economic opportunities and the introduction of cottage industries.

To implement this project, over US$1,000, 000 will be required for the next 3 years. US$ 100,000 will sponsored to develop the management and business plans for the proposed Make-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. US$ 70,000 will be used to conduct biological and socio-economic surveys in the area and its periphery. US$ 150, 000 will be used to support the development of economic activities and the introduction of cottage industries. Finally US$ 130,000 will be used for the payments of resource persons and the salaries of all staffs directly engaged into the project.

It is important to note that ERuDeF has received US$ 550,000 from the Rainforest Trust to support the creation of the proposed Mak-Betchou area.

ERuDeF runs several programs which includes but not limited to Great Apes conservation, Agro-forestry, forestry just to mentioned a few. The Great Apes component is focused on saving the last species of gorillas and chimpanzees across the Lebialem Highlands, in Upper Banyang and Nkingkwa Hills. The work on great apes also extends into the NW, East and South regions of Cameroon to focus on the remaining populations of gorillas and chimpanzees in those regions. Our work on great apes, in the country has led to the creation of the Lebialem Highlands Conservation Complex and the Lebialem-Mone Forest Landscape. Currently, ERuDeF has assisted the government of Cameroon to create the Tofala Hill Wildlife Sanctuary. Besides, ERuDeF is also assisting the government to protect the apes in the proposed Mak-Betchou forest, Nkingkwa Hills and Tofala-Mone Forest Corridor. ERuDeF also assisted the government of Cameroon in the development and validation of the management plan for the Deng Deng National Park in the East Region of Cameroon.

Therefore, this project that will span for three years will be carried out by a team of experts from the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) with long years of experience in protected area creation, management and conservation.

For more information, please go to www.erudef.org

26 September 2016

The Assessment of Status and Conservation of the African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) in the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary, South West Cameroon.

Posted in Volunteering and Internship, News, Views 928

 The Assessment of Status and Conservation of the African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) in the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary, South West Cameroon.

The Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary in the Lebialem Highland of SW Cameroon is one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the Gulf of Guinea (lower Guinea Forest). The highland is home to the African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) which is presently under serious threats both from the local communities and business world. In addition to this species, the critically endangered Cross River gorilla, the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, the African forest elephants, the Drills, and other endangered avian species, are found in this proposed Wildlife Sanctuary. This area has historically been under customary land-use and is currently being supported by the Environment Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) for transformation into a protected area.

The last bird (avian) inventory in this area was conducted in 2004-2005 by ERuDeF with support from the Rufford Small Grant. During this survey, it was realised that the Proposed Mak-Betchou area is very rich in avian species with the African grey parrot significantly present.

The socio-economic survey also observed that the African grey parrot was under serious threats from the local communities as it is being hunted in commercial quantities and sold as pets and food in the City markets. Other threats include habitat loss, fragmentation, deforestation and habitat degradation.

It is against this backdrop that ERuDeF is seeking financial support in order to create and manage proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. This will ensure the protection and conservation of the African grey parrots and other avian species in the area. The rich biodiversity of this area will also be greatly protected as a result of the creation of this site. Also, the project will ensure that the standard of living of the communities around the protected area be improved, so as to make the inhabitants not to be dependent on natural resources solely for survival.

                                    The project has as objectives the following;

Ø Creation of the proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary,

Ø Development of the management and business plans,

Ø Assessing the status(distribution, condition, etc) of the African grey parrots and other Avian species,

Ø Conduct Socio economic survey in the proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary,

Ø Create and support collaborative management structures.

To implement this project, over US$ 1,000.000 will be required for the next 3 years. US$ 100,000 will support the development of the management and business plans for the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. US$ 50,000 will be use in assessing the status (distribution, condition, etc) of the African grey parrots and other avian species. US$ 50,000 will be use to conduct Socio economic survey in the proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. US$ 160,000 will be used to Create and support collaborative management structures around the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary environs. Finally US$ 90,000 will be used for the payments of resource persons and the salaries of all staffs directly engaged into the project.

It is important to note that ERuDeF has received some US$ 550,000 from the Rainforest Trust to support the creation of the proposed Mak-Betchou area.

ERuDeF runs several programs which includes but not limited to Great Apes conservation, Agro-forestry, forestry just to mention a few. The Great Apes component is focused on saving the last species of gorillas and chimpanzees across the Lebialem Highlands, in Upper Banyang and Nkingkwa Hills. The work on great apes also extends into the NW, East and South regions of Cameroon to focus on the remaining populations of gorillas and chimpanzees in those regions. Our work on great apes, in the country has led to the creation of the Lebialem Highlands Conservation Complex and the Lebialem-Mone Forest Landscape. Currently, ERuDeF has assisted the government of Cameroon to create the Tofala Hill Wildlife Sanctuary. Besides, ERuDeF is also assisting the government to protect the apes in the proposed Mak-Betchou forest, Nkingkwa Hills and Tofala-Mone Forest Corridor. ERuDeF also assisted the government of Cameroon in the development and validation of the management plan for the Deng Deng National Park in the East Region of Cameroon.

The project that will span for about three years will be carried out by a team of experts from ERuDeF with long years of experience in Ornithology, Protected area creation, management and conservation.

For more information, please go to www.erudef.org

02 September 2016

Managing Biodiversity Population Through Creation of Conservation Corridors in Eastern Cameroon

Posted in News, Views 568

Managing Biodiversity Population Through Creation of Conservation Corridors in Eastern Cameroon

In Cameroon, natural resource allocation is largely the domain of only a few government institutions. Access to comprehensive information on land use allocation across sectors can facilitate improved coordination and analysis of how evenly resource rights are being distributed. Public knowledge of who has the rights to access which natural resources and according to what guidelines increases the degree to which all actors are held accountable (WRI, 2014).

Human pressure on forests is increasingly coming from areas outside of the traditional forest sector. Rising global commodity prices have led to an increased focus on expanding mineral extraction and industrial agricultural plantations. Rapidly developing urban areas need more land to meet their needs. Much of this expansion has, and will, come at the expense of historically forested land (WRI, 2014).

Protected areas in the East and South Regions of Cameroon are very rich in biodiversity. These protected areas harbours critical plants and animals species of global importance. In fact the South-East of Cameroon is one of the hotspots of biodiversity richness in the world. There are constant anthropogenic threats to species habitat and distribution. Habitat fragmentation and increased forest destruction and deterioration have resulted in species isolation. With increasing threats to these resources resulting from poaching and overhunting; lumbering, shifting cultivation and large forest clearance for the establishment of huge agro-industrial plantations, it is likely that these resources would be on a nose-dive decline if nothing is done.

Genetic connectivity among species will be of utmost importance if all the corridors linking these protected areas are securely protected. This will allow for genetic connectivity, easy migration of species and their  long term survival.

The East Region of Cameroon habours the Deng Deng National Park, with several forest blocks, which include: Communal Forest of Belabo, and a large logging concession, Unité Foret d’Amenagement ( UFA) 10065, Unité Technique d”Operations (UTOs) among others. From the Deng Deng National Park to Dja Faunal Reserve, there are five communal forests linking both National parks. These communal forests include Doume, Doumaintang, Angossas, Messamena and Mindourou.

These areas (Dja and Deng Deng) harbour endangered and critically endangered wildlife species which include the Western Lowland Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ), the forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), the Drill ( Mandrillus leucophaeus), the Buffalo (Syncerus nanus), Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx), Leopard (Panthera pardus)etc and a lot of endangered endemic birds (Francolin sp), reptiles,  and many amphibians species.

It is based on this that the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) wants to secure the Eastern  corridors of  Cameroon.

 Securing the Survival of Wildlife species through Protection of corridors of the Eastern Conservation Complex will ensure genetic connectivity (gene flow) and migratory patterns of wildlife species in the Conservation Complex.

The main objective of this project is to ensure genetic connectivity of wildlife species between Protected Areas (P As) through the management of National Parks and Communal Forests in the East and South Regions of Cameroon.

The genetic linking of the Deng Deng National Park biological populations to those of the Dja Biosphere Reserve is considered very critical at this time when extractive industries are on the rapid rise in the East Region of Cameroon. This project will also involve the management of the community and council forests found along this corridor.

To implement this project, over  US$800,000 will be require  for the next 3 years. US$4,200 will sponsor the identification, determination and migration patterns of wildlife population of one of the five  communal forest corridors linking the Deng Deng National Park and the Dja Reserve. Some US$2,600 will promote alternatives Income Generating Activities (IGA) to unsustainable natural resource use. Also, some US$3,000 will be used to Increase engagement with traditional authorities, elites, NGOs and the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife.

The project that will span for three years, will be carryout by a team of experts from the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) with long years of experience in conservation, Agronomy, Biomonitoring, and forest management. More information can be got on www.erudef.org

27 August 2016

Curtis McCoy Calls For Agroforestry System Extension To Northern Cameroon

Posted in News, Views 669

Curtis McCoy Calls For Agroforestry System Extension To Northern Cameroon

The Deputy Director of West Africa Programs of Tress for the Future in the United States, Mr. Curtis McCoy, has underscored the need for communities in the Adamawa Region of Cameroon to be trained on modern agroforestry techniques that will improve on the soil fertility of farmers in the Region.

Speaking at the end of a 3-day feasibility tour to the Region, August 19, 2016, Mr. Curtis said such a training will increase farm yields as well as improve on the livelihood of the communities in the Northern Region.

Aimed at determining the forest gardening potentials of the Adamawa region, the Deputy Director said the visit gave him the opportunity to see, discuss and have a deeper understanding of the agronomy needs of the Region.

“I spoke with farmers about their various challenges in relation to different seasons and in terms of crops cultivation for home consumption” he disclosed.

During this tour, Mr. Curtis discovered that very few farmers in the region practice sustainable gardening and field crop agriculture.

One of the farms visited during this tour was a mango orchard. Here, the Trees Partner noticed that the fruit tree had spacing problem and pruning too was lacking.

“These farmers put in much time and other resources but lack technical knowledge that can enable them better reap from the fruit of their labour” he lamented.

The situation also gave him an idea of where to deplore resources in a way that will create more impact in the communities.

“Much still have to be done especially in building local capacities and supporting livelihood activities in the Region,” Mr Curtis testified.

He said Trees for the Future and the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) would continue to work in close collaboration to find new project opportunities and ways of implementing such projects.

Reacting to Mr. Curtis visit, the President/CEO of ERuDeF, Louis Nkembi, said it was very important. This according to him is because it gives the partner a direct feeling of activities, challenges, prospects of projects and working environments.

By Queen Achingale

27 August 2016

Dryad Project Reinstates Hope In Community Forestry In SW Cameroon

Posted in News, Views 584

Dryad Project Reinstates Hope In Community Forestry In SW Cameroon

Inhabitants in areas where some community forests were selected for the first phase of the Dryad Project in Southwest Cameroon now believe they can exploit the full potentials of their community forests through sustainable management and exploitation of forest resources for the benefit of the community.

This was concluded during a sensitization campaign carried out recently on the Dryad Project by Implementing Organization, the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF).

The sensitization exercise took place in Akwen-Aborkem and Tinto in Manyu , Mbacof, Nlorma and Repa in Kupe- Manenguba and the Christain Philantropic Farms and Mission in Ndain; all Community Forests in the South West Region.

During this campaign, community members disclosed that they have over the years, lost interest in the community forest venture. This was because, while many could not exploit the full potentials of their community forests due to lack of finances and technical know-how, others were duped by some investors in relation with covetous elites.

This lost interest has however been rejuvenated with the coming of the Dryad project.

“The Dryad Project is an eye opener for us! We have concentrated our efforts on the exploitation of timber, neglecting other non –timber forest products (NTFPs). This project has now made us to understand NTFPs are equally very valuable,” said Chief Forbi Samuel of Ekenke in Kupe- Manenguba.

Meanwhile, communities are praying to God so they can be beneficiaries of the Dryad project.

“I see Dryad as a project that will help in the sustainable exploitation and management of our community forest which is still virgin and rich. In fact, we will henceforth go down on our knees and pray God locate Akwen and Aborkem Community Forest to benefit from such an opportunity” said Mr Cletus Eno, the Forest Management Officer for the Akwen community forest. The Akwen Community Forest boss said such an approach is what they have anticipated since the creation of the forest in 2004.

In response, the Dryad Project Focal Person for ERuDeF, Sheron Endah, said the selection will depend on the viability of enterprises selected by the community.

Dryad is a system created to provide training, technical assistance and financial support, to sustainable Community Forestry Enterprises through a network of locally-based Implementing Organizations.

By Sheron Endah

27 August 2016

90% Of Threatened Trees Planted At MCNP Survive!

Posted in News, Views 562

90% Of Threatened Trees Planted At MCNP Survive!

The Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF)’s efforts to conserve and restore globally threatened trees in the Mt Cameroon Nation Park (MCNP) and the peripheral zones is yielding success. Out of the 4724 seedlings of different threatened trees species planted in May 2016, over 90% are surviving.

This observation was made during an assessment conducted by ERuDeF and the MCNP teams last July 2016 aimed at evaluating Prunus africana (Pygeum), Entandrophragma angolensis (Tiama mahogany) and Lophira alata (Azobe) seedlings planted at the MCNP borders in May 2016.

During the evaluation exercise, Pygeum recorded 99.5% survival rate as 2040 of the 2050 planted survived while Mahogany recorded 99.6% survival rate meaning 1568 of the 1574 planted are doing well. For Azobe, 98 seedlings survived out of the 100 planted.

Because of this high survival rate, the Head of Monitoring and Research Unit, MCNP Mbeng Henderson, appreciated ERuDeF for her endless efforts in restoring the biodiversity of the Park and in providing alternative livelihoods to the bordering communities in the future.

“With the rapid adaptation and survival of these species, the Park and the communities are sure of a good number of timbers in the years to come,” Mr Mbeng said.

He equally applauded the efforts of the surrounding communities who took part in the planting exercise.

“The communities who took part in planting actually knew what they were doing and were conscious of the importance of the species. They have followed strictly the planting spacing and the distribution of different species in different points” the Head of the Monitoring and Research Unit applauded.

Mr Mbeng Henderson said MCNP has raised Pygeum seedlings in the nursery to continue the planting process. He appealed to ERuDeF to continue with the collaboration so the trees planted can be maintained till a stage of independence.

“These trees are tiny and for us the Park to effectively maintain them, we need an amount of support from ERuDeF”, Mbeng explained.

The Mt. Cameroon threatened trees project was conceived in September 2011 with aim to conserve and restore globally threatened trees in the MCNP and the peripheral zones. It is implemented by ERuDeF in collaboration with the local government stakeholders (Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife and the Mt. Cameroon National Park Service) with support from Fauna and Flora International (FFI) and Mohamed bin Zayed (MBZ) Species Conservation Fund.

By Adeline Tengem

27 August 2016

MINEPDED And ERuDeF Join Forces Against Biodiversity Depletion In Lebialem

Posted in News, Views 604

ERuDeF and MINEPDED Strategise to Combat  Deforestation in Lebialem

In order to reduce human pressure on the rich biodiversity of the Lebialem Highlands Conservation Complex, the Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF) and the Lebialem Divisional Delegation of the Ministry of Environment, Protection of Nature and Sustainable Development (MINEPDED) have agreed to come up with a harmonised conservation and reforestation strategy.

This agreement was arrived at during a meeting, August 4, 2016, at the MINEPDED Divisional Office in Menji.

Aimed at finding lasting solutions to the unsustainable exploitation of the biodiversity of the Lebialem Highlands Conservation Complex, these two institutions agreed to reinforce sensitization campaigns, provide alternative sources of energy and livelihood to communities within the Conservation Complex.

Representing ERuDeF at this meeting, the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Programme Coordinator, Samuel Ngueping, said many communities within the Lebialem Highlands Conservation Complex have as a result of poverty, resorted to environmentally unfriendly actions like deforestation, hunting, trapping, bush burning and the application of chemical fertilizers. These activities according to him, are depleting the Highlands’ biodiversity and making the area prone to landslides and soil erosions.

To ameliorate this plight, ERuDeF and MINEPDED officials underscored the need for the provision of improved cooking stoves. This according to them, will replace the use of fuel woods and limit deforestation in the Highlands.

“If deforestation is not halted, the human community would be put in great hardship. I hope to see stronger actions adopted after the fight against deforestation in the Division and the country at large” said Mr. Kanyimi Ihimbru Charles, the Lebialem Divisional Delegate of MINEPDED.

The Chief of Bureau for Environmental Conservation and Monitoring of the Delegation of MINEPDED, Lebialem, Ms. Nkwelle Maureen Tabi, on her part congratulated ERuDeF for her willingness to collaborate for the betterment of the environment in the Division and the country as a whole.

Meanwhile, plans are underway to regenerate the landscape through tree planting and to introduce farmers within the highlands to more sustainable farming methods in order to reduce the use of bush fire in the area.

By Ngueping Samuel

27 August 2016

ESD Coordinator Says Community Engagement Is Indispensable For Elephant Conservation In SW Cameroon

Posted in News, Views 507

ESD Coordinator Says Community Engagement Is Indispensable For Elephant Conservation In SW Cameroon

The Environment and Rural Development Foundation (ERuDeF)’s Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Programme Coordinator, Samuel Ngueping has reiterated the need for adjacent communities to African Elephant habitats to collaborate with conservation organizations in fighting against elephant poaching.

He was speaking, August 17, 2016, during a programme organised by ERuDeF at the Lebialem Community Radio as part of celebrations marking the 2016 World Elephant Day.

Observed on the theme “Bringing the World Together to Help Elephants”, the ERuDeF ESD Coordinator beseeched communities to retreat from practices that threaten the existence of this giant wildlife species.

“Many communities around wildlife habitats have the inclination of burning down wildlife habitats and cutting down trees to create space for farmlands. This act is detrimental to the existence of this species,” he advised.

Mr. Ngueping said the Southwest Region is an important hotspot for African Elephant, but this large mammal is one of the greatest victims of anthropogenic activities.

“There are about 400 African Elephants in Southwest Cameroon spread across various protected areas/biodiversity hotspots including; Mount Cameroon National Park, Korup National Park, Banyang Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary, Takamanda National Park, and the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary. These hotspots are surrounded by about 250,000 people, 80% of whom are peasant farmers. These farmers destroy elephant habitats, transforming them into agricultural farmlands” the ESD boss lamented.

On his part, an inhabitant of the Proposed Mak-Betchou Wildlife Sanctuary, Mr. Ebbe Bernard Fobeson, blamed this on ignorance on the part of communities on the importance of elephant conservation. He recommended that more awareness campaigns be carried out in communities adjacent to wildlife habitats on the importance of elephant conservation.

Mr. Ebbe also indicated the need for more alternative livelihood supports to be given to communities adjacent to African Elephant habitats and other wildlife species.

By Ngueping Samuel

<<  10 11 12 13 14 [1516 17 18 19  >>